PearlFection Patient Resources

Online Dental Education Library

The team of dental specialists and staff at PearlFection Dentistry in Frederick, MD, strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

Also, we like to provide interesting and helpful links to other resources we think our patients might value.  Below you will find a short description and a link to external dental related information that the doctors would like our patients to have access to:

  • Article on Probiotics and Oral Health

    http://www.dentaleconomics.com/articles/print/volume-102/issue-10/practice/oral-probiotics.html

  • Article on Oral Health and Cardiovascular Disease  /docs/Perio_heart and periodontal disease-1.pdf

  • This research article should be read by every endurance athlete, like runners, swimmers and bikers. For those of you who engage in endurance sports, proper hygiene is extremely important due to the chemical makeup of your saliva. View Article

  • We have long know that Probiotics are an important part of good oral health. Here is another article supporting that research. Please let me know when it is done. I want to post to facebook. View Article

  • Executive summary of evidence-based clinical recommendations for the use of pit-and-fissure sealants:  A report of the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs. View Article 

  • Article on Sealants use and their effectiveness in preventing cavities in children - Pit and Fissure Sealants in the Prevention of Dental Caries in Children and Adolescents. View Article

Gingivitis is the medical term for early gum disease, or periodontal disease. In general, gum disease can be caused by long-term exposure to plaque, the sticky but colorless film on teeth that forms after eating or sleeping.

Gum disease originates in the gums, where infections form from harmful bacteria and other materials left behind from eating. Early warning signs include chronic bad breath, tender or painful swollen gums and minor bleeding after brushing or flossing. In many cases, however, gingivitis can go unnoticed. The infections can eventually cause the gums to separate from the teeth, creating even greater opportunities for infection and decay.

Although gum disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults, in many cases it is avoidable.

If gingivitis goes untreated, more serious problems such as abscesses, bone loss or periodontitis can occur.

Periodontitis is treated in a number of ways. One method, called root planing, involved cleaning and scraping below the gum line to smooth the roots. If effective, this procedure helps the gums reattach themselves to the tooth structure.  However, not all instances of scaling and root planing successfully reattach the tooth to the gums.  Additional measures may be needed if the periodontal pockets persist after scaling and root planing

Pregnancy has also been known to cause a form of gingivitis. This has been linked to hormonal changes in the woman's body that promote plaque production.